Puzzles and Crosswords

September 2, 2010 § Leave a comment

The first crossword puzzle, created by Arthur ...

Image via Wikipedia

From BBC news page:

People who do puzzles and crosswords may stave off dementia longer but experience a more rapid decline once the disease sets in, a study suggests.

What bothers is the part about the more rapid decline. So one can prolong one’s decline by puzzling but at the price of a deeper fall? Is that a good deal?

Basically, there would be two alternatives. No crosswords, no quarrels about puzzles and an early but steady receding of one’s cerebral abilities once the dreadful loss of personality sets in.

Or the other possibility, a life peppered with crosswords and with hours spent brooding over all versions of Brain Age. Long hours. Piling up to days, weeks and even months of heavy duty brainpower workout. All that to keep the big oblivion at bay. But when it finally hits it hits hard.

Not much of a choice, is it?

Still, the later the better. That’s the only logic answer to the question. After all, puzzling is also supposed to keep your wits generally in top gear. So the time spent on it is really an investment into old age, regardless if one happens to be susceptible to dementia.

So, where is that crossword from the Times? Or does doing one’s tax return have the same effects? I prefer the Times crossword to the SA100 any day.

Come to think of it, there should be a rapid decline of dementia in the UK.

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